The Complete Sagas of Icelanders

I love great literature and storytelling. During my Classical Studies B.A. and Humanities minor, I enjoyed my journeys through Homer, Apollonius of Rhodes, Virgil, Dante, etc. In recent years my interests have shifted into the medieval time period, and from the Mediterranean region to northern Europe. I signed up for a MOOC on The Medieval Icelandic Sagas from the University of Iceland (which I described in a previous post), and that really got me excited and put me on a journey that looks to keep me busy for a good long time!

The Complete Sagas of Icelanders from Leifur Eiriksson Publishing.

Since the end of last year I have chosen to get The Complete Saga of Icelanders in one finely crafted collection with rigorous academic translations and explanations. This collection has 40 full sagas and 49 shorter tales. There is a lot of reading here! Although this cost 300 dollars, it is actually cheaper than buying them all in paperback from Penguin Books (which has taken most of the stories from the complete collection available from Leifur Eiriksson Publishing and turned them into paperbacks, albeit with a larger amount of editorial and historical background material with glossaries for each individual saga, which you expect from Penguin). Of course, I still have quite a few Penguin editions since they are more portable and I can read them while out and about, but I wanted a sturdy and well-bound collection to read while at home in my personal library. I have found both the hardcover Leifur Eiriksson collection and the Penguin editions are valuable and useful.

The slipcase collection comes with a useful guide booklet for the collection.
The interior of each book has charts and maps to assist the reader in acquiring a fuller picture of the sagas and the surrounding history and culture.
Individual Icelandic Sagas and related literature.

When it comes to the Saga of Icelanders, I have so far read Gisli Sursson’s Saga, The Saga of the People of Eyri, Njal’s Saga, and The Saga of Grettir the Strong, and I will be moving on to more of them. However, I have also planned more reading in the Poetic Edda, the Heimskringla, and some of the Viking Romances – I want to cover all the different types of Norse literature!

Medieval Icelandic Sagas

I love history, folklore, and literature. I’ve been meaning to get into the Icelandic Sagas for a while, but never made the big leap. But I recently got the motivation to sign up for The Medieval Icelandic Sagas online MOOC from the University of Iceland.

A selection of my Icelandic Saga texts.

Signing up for a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) is a mixed bag. Because you can sign up for it at any time and can take as long as you want, I suspect most people may start but never finish it, or they may finish but never get the most out of it since it is easy to coast or skip through them. Some of the presentations can also be boring. However, if you are self-motivated, then a MOOC can be a great way to augment your knowledge on some topic.

In the case of this Icelandic Saga MOOC, I get in one neat package a six week overview of all aspects of the Sagas. The syllabus is as follows:
Week 1: Historical Overview
Week 2: Manuscripts
Week 3: Landscape and Archaeology
Week 4: Saga Characters
Week 5: Paganism and Christianity
Week 6: The Supernatural

I have an undergraduate degree in classical civilizations and graduate degrees in philosophy, so I have the skills to do academic research. What this course provides is a surface look at six key areas to begin study and I can then bring to bear my abilities to build upon it. This is something interesting for me at a personal level in two ways (i) I am shifting my research into medieval studies, and (ii) Norse culture plays a large part in my Castles & Crusades campaigns and my developing game world, and this will allow me to bring that to life in a richer way.

I’ve completed the first two weeks of work so far and look forward to the rest. I plan to space the remainder out through the end of the year. When this is done I should have a much richer view of medieval Iceland.

If anyone is interested in looking into this, here is a link:
https://www.edx.org/course/the-medieval-icelandic-sagas-2