Virtual GameHole Con 2020, Day 4

Summary
Final day of gaming at Virtual GameHole Con 2020. I played in a 0-level funnel adventure for Dungeon Crawl Classics (DCC), and I consider virtual convention gaming practices vs. convention gaming in person.

DCC core books, and my four 0-level characters, two have the stamp of death on them.

For the final day of gaming at Virtual GameHole Con 2020 I played in a 0-level funnel adventure for DCC – Hole in the Sky. I began with four 0-level characters and two survived!

The adventure began with 5 players controlling 20 0-level characters. The fun thing about DCC 0-level characters is that you begin with nothing. Our characters began with 4 hit points, and my characters – a dwarven mushroom-farmer, a dwarven chest-maker, a slave, and a halfling trader – had no armor and their weapons included chisels and a club. Like so many DCC adventures, there were some wonderous things (e.g. an invisible bridge that we traveled on for days), and strange dimensions with weird creatures. People are suspicious, and a single hit can from a monster or an unfortunate fall can kill you instantly. I own the Goodman Games stamps that you can use on your character sheets if your character dies and when I lost two characters during the latter part of the adventure, I was able to use the stamp of death on my slave and halfling trader since our judge (who normally does it when you game in person) couldn’t do it obviously due to distance gaming on Zoom. The game ended well for my two dwarves with them acquiring armor and weapons – a great start as they can now begin their careers as level 1 dwarves.

I spent Thursday – Saturday getting used to rolling digital dice on Discord and Roll20, but today our Judge wanted us to roll our dice by hand and it felt good to do real table-top gaming. Real hand rolling is for me what RPG gaming is about. One takeaway from this virtual convention is that although I can see some uses for virtual rolling, hand rolling is superior. Also, as an educator I know that a person learns best by doing. The more you rely on VTT’s to do all the calculations for you, the less you are going to learn about the game. I play DCC heavily at Con of the North, Gary Con, and GameHole three times each year, and in between I run Castles & Crusades in all my multiple weekly games, so I sometimes need to be reminded of certain DCC rules. My Roll20 experience was relatively easy (once I figured out the minimum basics of that interface) and all I had to do was click a button and everything was done for me. But it is a bad system if you actually want to learn the game (or advance your current knowledge of it). I did more actually DCC system learning in this Sunday game than in the previous three games I participated in on Friday and Saturday. When you are forced to learn what you add/subtract, and you have to do the calculations yourself you have to learn. I do worry about the slow dumbing down we are experiencing as we rely more and more on technology to do things for us as we just sit back and push buttons and don’t have to engage our minds as much.

This Sunday game was also completely theatre of mind – no maps or anything – and I think in hindsight a little art sharing or a generalized layout of a couple of areas we traveled to would’ve been helpful (and I am not trying to criticize my Judge for the game, he was very good, but some visuals do help). Although I am a theatre of mind person myself, when I run my C&C games on Discord I always have screen share in use to show my players a piece of art or a dungeon map fragment. So although I will not go back to my 3E days of dwarven forge and dungeon maps (that tactical stuff slows things down way too much and reduces ones ability to imagine things outside the box), it is helpful to have some visual assistance to help guide your imagination. After the adventure today I looked up Hole in the Sky and was of course impressed by the art inside (DCC stands on its own with its very unique style of art) and things came together a lot better for me when I could connect my experiences with the visuals.

There are several reasons why I game at conventions:
1. To try new games, or to play the games I love that are overshadowed by the giants of 5E and Pathfinder (i.e. DCC, Swords & Wizardry, Astonishing Swordsmen and Sorcerers of Hyperborea, C&C).
2. Meet new players who I can join with again at these same conventions in the future, or, if they are from Minnesota, might game with me in person.
3. Experience different GM styles so that I can improve my own games. This convention I experienced a couple of different takes on how to game on Discord (slightly different from how I run things in my games), I experienced Roll20 for the first time, and I played in my first Zoom game.

These experiences all had their strengths and weaknesses technology wise. The sad thing about gaming virtually is when the game is over everyone instantly exits the virtual gaming table and disappears. Whereas in person you can chat afterword and gain new friends. I really missed that.

One takeaway from this is that as soon as we begin gaming in person again I will return to visiting GaryCon and GameHole (these Wisconsin conventions are just 4-5 hours from where I live in Minnesota), Con of the North takes place 15 minutes from where I live, so I will obviously game in person there, but I will consider virtual gaming in the future for other conventions further away from me (so, for example, I would love to visit North Texas RPG Con since I am an old-school gamer and I have only heard good things about that Con, but I really don’t have an interest in driving or flying down to Texas. So if virtual gaming becomes a long term part of that convention, then I would register for that virtually. Virtual gaming conventions are in some ways a frustration, but they can also open up new opportunities).